THE IDEAL AS A COMPASS (a workshop for Feldenkrais® Practitioners and trainees)

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THE IDEAL AS A COMPASS (a workshop for Feldenkrais® Practitioners and trainees)

400.00

Date: Sat/Sun July 28-29

Time:  Saturday: 1:15 pm — 6:45 pm (30 minute coffee break)
Sunday: 10:00 am — 5:30 pm (1 hour lunch break)

Location: New York LiveArts, 219 West 19th Street, New York, NY 10011 
Tuition: $350 by July 13, then $400
Equipment: mats, rollers, and head pads will be provided.  Practitioners should bring their own tables for FI practice.  

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The mediocre, the normal, what we call the natural is definitely not the ideal. And therefore it comes out that we talk about something that we aim for, but that you rarely achieve. But it gives you the possibility to know the direction of the practice, the direction of where and with what means to take in order to direct the development in the best direction. And that’s something that can’t be dismissed. 
— Moshe Feldenkrais, AY lecture (translated from Hebrew by Anat Meiri)

THE IDEAL AS A COMPASS

If you know where you are, you can go where you want.

Just as a compass will guide your direction, an image of the ideal helps you confidently understand your client’s needs and shape the learning process you create together in its ultimate direction. 

As practitioners, we have a variety of techniques, strategies, ATM® lessons, and anatomical knowledge at our disposal. In order to help our clients, we need to be clearly oriented in how the lessons unfold, and whether or not they’re taking us in the direction we want to go.

Working with a clear image of the ideal helps you accurately assess how your clients move, organize your resources to craft the lessons, and guide your clients as they improve their capacities for support, vitality and efficiency, and integrate them into their life. Here’s Moshe speaking about how he uses the image of the ideal:  

Therefore we can see how that brain organizes this body, how it works. Therefore we can see very funny things. Does it work as it would with an ideal nervous system, with an ideal life, with an ideal body?  How would it work? And by knowing that, presenting a thing that doesn’t exist, you find out which point, which part of that system, is most away from the ideal.  And obviously if you dare make a change, it would be a marvelous thing. The person would feel, “ah, I am relieved,” because the most troublesome point got better. That’s our point, to find out which part of that system works least well.
— Amherst Video Archive: Irene Lesson 2: Moshe explaining entire time while working on right hip and shoulder. Gideon Ariel watching. (16 July 1980). https://feldenkrais-method.org/archive/collection/irene-lesson-2/ [at the 7:15 mark]

In this practice oriented workshop, you will study and refine an image of the ideal by exploring selected principles given to us by Moshe (for example: reversibility, the force passing up and through the spine, the breath free in the action). The principles are how Moshe describes and specifies the ideal.

Participants will: 

  1. Learn how to use the image of the ideal to confidently see and understand your client’s needs. 
  2. Study ATM® with an emphasis on selected principles to sense and understand function more clearly in yourself. 
  3. Learn how to include principle-based thinking and sensing in FI®. 
  4. Skillfully invite students to actively participate in their lessons.
  5. Make the learning experience clear and useful for your students.

 

Teachers: 

Andrew Gibbons and Anat Meiri have been close colleagues for over 11 years and share an office in Union Square where they maintain private practices.  Since 2008 they have mentored with trainer Jeff Haller, contributing to the creation of his IOPS Academy graduate program for practitioners (Ideal Organization and Profound Strength).  Andrew and Anat were teaching assistants in the IOPS NYC program, and Andrew also taught in the recent IOPS Seattle program. Over the years they have studied together and taught each other, exploring ATM and FI material, sharing ideas, giving each other lessons, and honing and clarifying their practice of the Feldenkrais Method. Andrew became an Assistant Trainer in 2017.